That’s why it’s called Iceland! Beautiful cave walls glisten within country’s largest glacier

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That’s why it’s called Iceland! Beautiful cave walls glisten within country’s largest glacier

  • Vatnajökull, Vatna Glacier in English, is Iceland’s largest glacier and covers eight per cent of the country
  • Globsl travel photographer of the year James Rushforth, 33, from Worchester captured images of the caves
  • During the last ice age the ice cap was subject to seismic activity as large eruptions left pockets of water
  • A cave system flows throughout the structure leaving perfectly circular shapes in the walls of the glacier

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These breathtaking images taken inside a glacier by an award-winning photographer show the caves within a mass of ice so large it covers eight per cent of Iceland.

Vatnajökull, which translates to Vatna Glacier in English, is the country’s largest ice cap and features stunning walls of glistening ice inside multiple chambers.

Global travel photographer of the year James Rushforth, 33, from Worchester, UK, took to his skis to capture the caves within the expanse of frozen water.

During the last ice age the ice cap was subject to seismic activity, with large eruptions causing pockets of water to form within the structure. 

Under the glacier several volcanoes rapidly melted the ice and sent floods of water cascading down the sides of the frozen mass.

The average thickness of the ice is 1246 feet and images show paths within the caves where ice walls rise high above the explorer.

In other areas perfectly circular holes have formed in the side of the glacier. These lead towards the centre via a number of chambers. 

Two explorers pose within large perfectly circular holes that formed naturally within Vatnajökull, which translates to Vatna Glacier in English. Iceland’s largest ice cap features stunning walls of glistening ice inside multiple chambers within an expanse of frozen water

Global travel photographer of the year James Rushforth, 33, from Worchester, UK, took to his skis to capture the caves within the glacier. This image captured the way ice formed around a chamber of water after eruptions melted large portions of ice during an ice age

Global travel photographer of the year James Rushforth, 33, from Worchester, UK, took to his skis to capture the caves within the glacier. This image captured the way ice formed around a chamber of water after eruptions melted large portions of ice during an ice age

The images capture the way the light inside the caves bounces off the rippled walls. The various chambers all appear to be different sizes. This one is wider than it is high. Skates are worn inside the make travelling across the ice floor easier while exploring the expanse of frozen water

The images capture the way the light inside the caves bounces off the rippled walls. The various chambers all appear to be different sizes. This one is wider than it is high. Skates are worn inside the make travelling across the ice floor easier while exploring the expanse of frozen water

During the last ice age the ice cap was subject to seismic activity, with large eruptions causing pockets of water to form within the structure

Pathways appear to have formed inside the caves, which adventurers can follow to wind their way inside the structure of the glacier

During the last ice age the ice cap was subject to seismic activity, with large eruptions causing pockets of water to form within the structure. Pathways appear to have formed inside the caves, which adventurers can follow to wind their way inside the glacier

Mr Rushforth captured the sparkle caused by bouncing light on the ice walls of the glacier. Here one member of his team has donned ice skates to explore the cave system. Thousands of years ago several volcanoes rapidly melted the ice and sent floods of water cascading down the sides of the frozen mass

Mr Rushforth captured the sparkle caused by bouncing light on the ice walls of the glacier. Here one member of his team has donned ice skates to explore the cave system. Thousands of years ago several volcanoes rapidly melted the ice and sent floods of water cascading down the sides of the frozen mass

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