Officer involved in the Breonna Taylor shooting is under investigation for sexual assault

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One of the Kentucky cops involved in the raid in which Breonna Taylor was shot dead is under investigation for sexual assault after multiple women came forward with claims, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday. 

Officer Brett Hankison, 44, is said to have offered two of his alleged victims a ride home in his police car before molesting them and is accused of harassing a third woman at a bar as he offered to give her a ‘safe ride home’. 

In each of the accusations, Hankison was said to have been in his police uniform and using his cop car.  

The women spoke out this week amid protests citing the death of Taylor, 26, on March 13 in Louisville in the fight against police brutality.

Officer Hankison has already been accused of having a ‘vendetta’ against another man and of being ‘a dirty cop’ in an October lawsuit; he denied all the claims.  

Officer Brett Hankison, 44, pictured, has been accused of sexual assault and harassment by at least three women and is now under investigation. He is one of three Louisville police officers who carried out a no-knock raid on the home of Breonna Taylor that resulted in her death

Breonna Taylor, 26, died in the early hours of March 13 after law enforcement raided the home she shared with her boyfriend Kenneth Walker in Louisville, Kentucky

Breonna Taylor, 26, died in the early hours of March 13 after law enforcement raided the home she shared with her boyfriend Kenneth Walker in Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday a broad investigation into the accusations of sexual assault made against officer Brett Hankison after three women came forward

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday a broad investigation into the accusations of sexual assault made against officer Brett Hankison after three women came forward

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced the investigation Thursday after law graduate Margo Borders, medic Emily Terry and a third woman Morgan Miller each shared their story on social media this week. 

The LMPD’s Public Integrity Unit had previously opened an investigation into the allegations. 

‘But now we are also investigating this matter jointly under the auspices of the Kentucky Public Corruption/Civil Rights Task Force, which consists of FBI, LMPD, KSP, and the KY AG’s office,’ the mayor said in a letter.  

Mayor Fischer said he has also written to the the River City Fraternal Order of Police  demanding that Officer Hankison be removed from his position as a member of the Louisville Police Merit Board. 

The FOP membership elected him to the board, which reviews any disciplinary appeals and consists of five civilians appointed by the Mayor and two police officers elected by the FOP. 

‘Given the very serious allegations against him and investigations by the Attorney General and the FBI, it is profoundly inappropriate for him to be in this role,’ the Mayor added. 

‘In the event the FOP does not act, we will work with the Metro Council and Jefferson County Attorney’s office to find other ways to remove him from the board.’

The Mayor has directed LMPD not to submit any cases to the Police Merit Board for consideration until this matter is resolved. 

Three woman – Margo Borders, Emily Terry and Morgan Miller-  took to social media this week to make the accusations against Hankison.  

Borders, who studied law at the University of Louisville, said: ‘In April of 2018 I went out to a bar with some friends. I went to call an uber home and a police officer who I had interacted with on many occasions at bars in St. Matthews offered me a ride home. 

‘He drove me home in uniform, in his marked car, invited himself into my apartment and sexually assaulted me while I was unconscious. 

‘I never reported him out of fear of retaliation. I had no proof of what happened and he had the upper hand because he was a police officer. Who do you call when the person who assaulted you is a police officer? Who were they going to believe?’ 

In a second online accusation Terry, who appears to have recently graduated as a physician assistant from Sullivan University, wrote: ‘This is Brett Hankison. In early fall, I began walking home from a bar intoxicated. 

‘A police officer pulled up next to me and offered me a ride home. I thought to myself, “Wow. That is so nice of him.” And willingly got in. 

‘He began making sexual advances towards me; rubbing my thigh, kissing my forehead, and calling me “baby”. Mortified, I did not move. I continued to talk about my grad school experiences and ignored him. 

‘As soon as he pulled up to my apartment building, I got out of the car and ran to the back. My friend reported this the next day, and of course nothing came from it.’  

Three women - Margo Borders, pictured, Morgan Miller and Emily Terry - each shared their story on social media this week. The allegations are now under investigation

Three women – Margo Borders, pictured, Morgan Miller and Emily Terry – each shared their story on social media this week. The allegations are now under investigation

Emily Terry, pictured, spoke out amid protests citing the death of Taylor in Louisville in the fight against police brutality. She says Hankison assaulted her in his police car

Emily Terry, pictured, spoke out amid protests citing the death of Taylor in Louisville in the fight against police brutality. She says Hankison assaulted her in his police car

Terry, who appears to have recently graduated as a physician assistant from Sullivan University, wrote on Facebook this week: 'He began making sexual advances towards me; rubbing my thigh, kissing my forehead, and calling me “baby”'

Terry, who appears to have recently graduated as a physician assistant from Sullivan University, wrote on Facebook this week: ‘He began making sexual advances towards me; rubbing my thigh, kissing my forehead, and calling me “baby”’

Accusing Hankison, Borders said: 'He drove me home in uniform, in his marked car, invited himself into my apartment and sexually assaulted me while I was unconscious'

Accusing Hankison, Borders said: ‘He drove me home in uniform, in his marked car, invited himself into my apartment and sexually assaulted me while I was unconscious’

The third accusation was made by Miller who wrote in a Facebook post that she was repeatedly pushed by a uniformed Hankison to take a ride home while outside a bar in Louisville. 

She refused but he asked her to hand over her phone and he took her number and added her on social media app Snapchat. 

‘He took my number and scanned my Snapchat ID. He then tried tirelessly to persuade me to get me into his car,’ Miller wrote. 

‘He even begged under the guise to provide me with “a safe ride home.” I turned him down over and over, and luckily walked away unscathed. 

‘Weeks later he started sending pictures and videos of himself masturbating via Snapchat. I blocked him immediately,’ she continued. 

‘My story ended with unsolicited pictures of his penis and a blocked number. But I have no doubt that if I got into his car that night that my story, like many of the women coming forward, would be much worse.’ 

Hankison is also the subject of an ongoing federal lawsuit – unrelated to the shooting incident in March – which accuses him of targeting another man, Kendrick Wilson, and planting drugs, The Courier Journal reported. 

It says Hankison arrested Wilson three times over a two year period at bars where he worked as off duty security. The charges against Wilson stemming from these incidents were dropped on two of these occasions. One case is still pending.  

The suit says Hankison and Wilson were also involved in ‘a relationship with the same woman’. It says the officer was ‘unfairly targeting’ Wilson.

Morgan Miller, pictured, also posted her story to Facebook on June 5 in which she claimed that officer Hankison had attempted to give her a ride home in his cop car from a Louisville bar

Morgan Miller, pictured, also posted her story to Facebook on June 5 in which she claimed that officer Hankison had attempted to give her a ride home in his cop car from a Louisville bar 

Miller said in her post, pictured, that a uniformed Hankison approached her and added her on Snapchat. Days later he began sending her unsolicited explicit pictures and videos

Miller said in her post, pictured, that a uniformed Hankison approached her and added her on Snapchat. Days later he began sending her unsolicited explicit pictures and videos

Taylor, a 26-year-old black emergency medical tech, was shot eight times on March 13 after officers including Hankison and his two colleagues Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove, knocked down the front door of the home she shared with boyfriend Kenneth Walker in a drugs raid. No drugs were found in the home. 

It is unclear which officer fired the shots which killed Taylor but a lawsuit filed by her family said the officers ‘spray(ed) gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life’.

Taylor had no criminal record and worked for two local hospitals. The lawsuit alleges that the three police officers, who are now on administrative leave, fired at least 20 rounds into the home. 

Breonna’s boyfriend Kenneth can be heard on the call crying and calling Taylor’s name in the 911 call made shortly after her death.

‘Somebody kicked in the door and shot my girlfriend,’ Walker tells a dispatcher. He says Taylor is on the ground and that she was shot in the stomach.

Prosecutors dropped an attempted murder charge against Walker for shooting an officer who entered the apartment. Also last week, Louisville’s police chief announced his retirement and the mayor changed police warrant search policies. 

Taylor’s family says that Louisville cops obtained the warrant used to raid her home based on false information that investigators gave to the judge. 

Breonna Taylor

The search warrant used to justify the police raid which left Breonna Taylor, pictured, 26, dead on March 13 claimed that Taylor’s home was used by a suspected drug dealer, Jamarcus Glover to receive suspicious packages. The family says this claim is false and is suing police

Protesters march holding placards and a portrait of Breonna Taylor during a demonstration against racism and police brutality, in Hollywood, California on June 7

Protesters march holding placards and a portrait of Breonna Taylor during a demonstration against racism and police brutality, in Hollywood, California on June 7

Balloons and a drawing for Breonna Taylor, who was killed by police officers, hangs at the fence of Lafayette Square near the White House, to protest police brutality on June 7

Balloons and a drawing for Breonna Taylor, who was killed by police officers, hangs at the fence of Lafayette Square near the White House, to protest police brutality on June 7

Attorneys for the family of 26-year-old Breonna filed a lawsuit against Louisville Metro Police Department alleging that a detective falsely claimed that a drug suspect was receiving postal packages at her house.

In the early morning hours of March 13, Louisville police executed a ‘no-knock’ raid on her home as part of an investigation centered on two men suspected of selling drugs in the Russell section of the city. 

Taylor’s apartment in southwest Jefferson County was more than 10 miles away from the Russell neighborhood, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.

Police suspected Taylor’s home was used to receive drugs, and a judge signed off on a ‘no-knock’ warrant allowing law enforcement officials to raid her home.

Just before 1am, Louisville police said they identified themselves before using a battering ram to enter Taylor’s home, where she and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were in bed. 

Taylor’s neighbors and her family dispute this. They said police never identified themselves, and that Walker, who was legally allowed to carry a firearm, shot at the cops thinking that he was being robbed.

Prosecutors dropped an attempted murder charge against Taylor's boyfriend Kenneth Walker for shooting an officer who entered the apartment with a no-knock warrant

Prosecutors dropped an attempted murder charge against Taylor’s boyfriend Kenneth Walker for shooting an officer who entered the apartment with a no-knock warrant

The suit claims that LMPD Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, pictured, and officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove entered their apartment without announcing themselves

The suit claims that LMPD Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove, pictured, entered their apartment without announcing themselves

 The suit claims that LMPD Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, left, and officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove, right, entered their apartment without announcing themselves

Police responded with gunfire, killing Taylor, who suffered eight gunshot wounds.

Walker had been arrested and charged with first-degree assault and attempted murder of a police officer after Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly was shot in the leg during the raid.

Mattingly, Hankison, and Cosgrove were the three detectives who raided Taylor’s home.

All three officers are named as defendants in the lawsuit filed by Taylor’s family.   

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