Moment angler drops a line at Australia’s most notorious saltwater crocodile spot

0
9


A fisherman who cast a line in a croc-infested waterway has been filmed moments away from becoming a saltwater predator’s catch of the day.

Footage of the close encounter at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu National Park shows the angler quickly reeling in a fish as a crocodile approaches the bridge he was casting from.

The large animal can be seen swimming toward the man’s catch in the murky water nearby before turning to face him as he reels it in.

As soon as the man has the fish in hand, he turns to walk away but does a double take and scurries back to pick an item off the ground. 

Footage of the close encounter at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu National Park shows the angler (pictured) quickly reeling in a fish and hurriedly walking away before turning back  to pick something up as a crocodile approaches the bridge he was casting from

The shocking moment, which was shared on social media on August 27, was watched by two others in the background.

A woman behind the camera can be heard nervously laughing at situation as she predicts the man’s actions.

‘He’s going to get it out before he gets to him,’ she said. 

Daily Mail Australia reached out to the video’s owner for comment. 

The horrifying encounter was filmed just days before a 4.4 metre, 250kg saltwater male crocodile was trapped in the Flora River Nature Park – about 120 kilometres south-west of Katherine and about three hours from Kakadu National Park.  

It was the largest croc caught in the Flora River by local rangers in about five years.

The August 27 encounter was filmed just days before a 4.4 metre, 250kg male saltwater croc (pictured) was trapped in the Flora River Nature Park - about 120 kilometres south-west of Katherine and about three hours from Kakadu National Park

The August 27 encounter was filmed just days before a 4.4 metre, 250kg male saltwater croc (pictured) was trapped in the Flora River Nature Park – about 120 kilometres south-west of Katherine and about three hours from Kakadu National Park

The catch followed a 3.3 metre male saltwater croc (pictured) being caught in the Katherine River - 55 kilometres downstream of Katherine - last week

The catch followed a 3.3 metre male saltwater croc (pictured) being caught in the Katherine River – 55 kilometres downstream of Katherine – last week

Cahills Crossing has had a string of other near-death experiences with locals and tourists getting up close and personal with huge packs of crocs. 

Last month a tourist was spotted sitting on the edge of the croc-infected riverbank, trying to lure in one of the predators by slapping the water with a stick for a selfie. 

Campbell and Cheryl Brodie, who were horrified to see the man so close to the animals while visiting from South Australia, said they spotted at least a dozen crocs lurking in the water and were bracing themselves for the man to be taken.  

‘I decided to take the photo of him squatting there so we could ID him to the cops,’ Mr Brodie told the NT News

‘We counted 11 crocs in the area in front of the viewing platform and a couple on the lower side.’ 

At one stage the selfie taker was within five metres of a crocodile and was even splashing the water with his hand to draw them in.

The couple repeatedly told him to stay back but he ignored their warnings.

The Cahills Crossing encounter also followed a tourist being filmed sitting on the edge of the croc-infected riverbank (pictured), trying to lure in one of the predators by slapping the water with a stick for a selfie

The Cahills Crossing encounter also followed a tourist being filmed sitting on the edge of the croc-infected riverbank (pictured), trying to lure in one of the predators by slapping the water with a stick for a selfie 

Cahills Crossing is notorious for having large numbers of crocodiles as tourists race to get through unscathed

Cahills Crossing is notorious for having large numbers of crocodiles as tourists race to get through unscathed

Despite the string of danger signs surrounding the crossing, the man told the couple he simply wanted to get a closer look.

‘He showed no fear or concern for his own safety,’ Mr Brodie said, adding the man luckily survived.

Rachelle Wastle and her husband Peter were driving through the crossing in early August when they were blocked by a dozen crocodiles.

Terrifying video footage shows the couple’s car submerged into water as they attempted to cross to the other side of the river. 

Mrs Wastle told Daily Mail Australia she and her husband had been taking advantage of the Northern Territory’s long weekend and had been camping in Cobourg Peninsula.

The couple were returning to their home in Darwin.

‘We were fine with the crocodiles, we are used to them now,’ she said.

‘We had been camping in an area where you walk along the beach and a crocodile would appear two metres in front of you.’

The crocodiles eventually began to move out of the way of the vehicle in chase of food.

Crocodiles are a common occurrence at the crossing and one 40-year-old man, Kerry McLoughlin was tragically taken and decapitated by one in 1987. 

Visitors continue to flock to the area.

A group of saltwater crocodiles are seen swimming at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory

A group of saltwater crocodiles are seen swimming at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory

Video footage captured the terrifying moment a couple were stuck in the middle of Cahills Crossing (pictured), a popular spot in Kakadu National Park, notorious for saltwater crocodiles

Video footage captured the terrifying moment a couple were stuck in the middle of Cahills Crossing (pictured), a popular spot in Kakadu National Park, notorious for saltwater crocodiles

In 2019, shocking footage emerged of a croc stealing a fisherwoman’s catch of the day at a popular spot known for being infected with saltwater predators.

The footage of the woman quickly retreating backwards at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu National Park made headlines around the country.

She dashed out of frame before another man appeared to attempt to scoop up the large fish but failed when he was scared off by the oncoming croc.

The saltwater giant was seen launching itself from the water onto the bridge and quickly moving toward the fish.

It then turned its head to the left and smacks its teeth down on the woman’s catch before gobbling it up in eight bites.

Standing proudly for a brief moment, it slowly retreated to the murky water.  

In 2019, shocking footage emerged of a croc stealing a fisherwoman's catch of the day at a popular spot known for being infected with saltwater predators (pictured)

In 2019, shocking footage emerged of a croc stealing a fisherwoman’s catch of the day at a popular spot known for being infected with saltwater predators (pictured)

The saltwater giant was seen launching itself from the water onto the bridge and quickly moving toward the fish. It then turned its head to the left and smacks its teeth down on the woman's catch before gobbling it up in eight bites (pictured)

The saltwater giant was seen launching itself from the water onto the bridge and quickly moving toward the fish. It then turned its head to the left and smacks its teeth down on the woman’s catch before gobbling it up in eight bites (pictured)

CAHILLS CROSSING

The infamous Cahills Crossing is only a few metres wide, but it’s one of Australia’s most dangerous bodies of water.

Along with varying tides, the water flow is strong enough to overturn vehicles, and it serves as a feeding ground for saltwater crocodiles.

Dozens of divers try to venture across the submerged crossing, but end up being washed in to croc-infested waters.

Many have lost their lives, including fisherman, children, photographers, and backpackers.

Crocodile expert Grahame Webb said for every crocodile you can see, there are 10 you can’t.

The most famous fatality at the Crossing was in 1897 when 40-year-old Kerry McLoughlin was decapitated by a crocodile on a fishing trip.

Rangers counted 120 crocodiles in the six-kilometre stretch around Cahills Crossing.

There have been five fatalities in the area so far.

Sources:  Venture North and news.com.au

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here